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2011 Academy Awards


Aartemys
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It's that time of year again folks...the glitz, the glam, the golden statuette!

 

Who do you think will take home Oscar?

 

 

Actor in a Leading Role

Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”

Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”

Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”

Colin Firth in “The King's Speech”

James Franco in “127 Hours”

 

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale in “The Fighter”

John Hawkes in “Winter's Bone”

Jeremy Renner in “The Town”

Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”

Geoffrey Rush in “The King's Speech”

 

Actress in a Leading Role

Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”

Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”

Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter's Bone”

Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”

Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”

 

Actress in a Supporting Role

Amy Adams in “The Fighter”

Helena Bonham Carter in “The King's Speech”

Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”

Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”

Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”

 

Animated Feature Film

“How to Train Your Dragon” Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois

“The Illusionist” Sylvain Chomet

“Toy Story 3” Lee Unkrich

 

Art Direction

“Alice in Wonderland”

Production Design: Robert Stromberg; Set Decoration: Karen O'Hara

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1”

Production Design: Stuart Craig; Set Decoration: Stephenie McMillan

“Inception”

Production Design: Guy Hendrix Dyas; Set Decoration: Larry Dias and Doug Mowat

“The King's Speech”

Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Judy Farr

“True Grit”

Production Design: Jess Gonchor; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

 

Cinematography

“Black Swan” Matthew Libatique

“Inception” Wally Pfister

“The King's Speech” Danny Cohen

“The Social Network” Jeff Cronenweth

“True Grit” Roger Deakins

 

Costume Design

“Alice in Wonderland” Colleen Atwood

“I Am Love” Antonella Cannarozzi

“The King's Speech” Jenny Beavan

“The Tempest” Sandy Powell

“True Grit” Mary Zophres

 

Directing

“Black Swan” Darren Aronofsky

“The Fighter” David O. Russell

“The King's Speech” Tom Hooper

“The Social Network” David Fincher

“True Grit” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

 

Documentary (Feature)

“Exit through the Gift Shop” Banksy and Jaimie D'Cruz

“Gasland” Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic

“Inside Job” Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs

“Restrepo” Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger

“Waste Land” Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley

 

Documentary (Short Subject)

“Killing in the Name” Nominees to be determined

“Poster Girl” Nominees to be determined

“Strangers No More” Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon

“Sun Come Up” Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger

“The Warriors of Qiugang” Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

 

Film Editing

“Black Swan” Andrew Weisblum

“The Fighter” Pamela Martin

“The King's Speech” Tariq Anwar

“127 Hours” Jon Harris

“The Social Network” Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

 

Foreign Language Film

“Biutiful” Mexico

“Dogtooth” Greece

“In a Better World” Denmark

“Incendies” Canada

“Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi)” Algeria

 

Makeup

“Barney's Version” Adrien Morot

“The Way Back” Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk and Yolanda Toussieng

“The Wolfman” Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

 

Music (Original Score)

“How to Train Your Dragon” John Powell

“Inception” Hans Zimmer

“The King's Speech” Alexandre Desplat

“127 Hours” A.R. Rahman

“The Social Network” Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

 

Music (Original Song)

“Coming Home” from “Country Strong” Music and Lyric by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey

“I See the Light” from “Tangled” Music by Alan Menken Lyric by Glenn Slater

“If I Rise” from “127 Hours” Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong

“We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3" Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

 

Best Picture

“Black Swan” Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers

“The Fighter” David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman and Mark Wahlberg, Producers

“Inception” Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers

“The Kids Are All Right” Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte and Celine Rattray, Producers

“The King's Speech” Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers

“127 Hours” Christian Colson, Danny Boyle and John Smithson, Producers

“The Social Network” Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ceán Chaffin, Producers

“Toy Story 3” Darla K. Anderson, Producer

“True Grit” Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, Producers

“Winter's Bone" Anne Rosellini and Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Producers

 

Short Film (Animated)

“Day & Night” Teddy Newton

“The Gruffalo” Jakob Schuh and Max Lang

“Let's Pollute” Geefwee Boedoe

“The Lost Thing” Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann

“Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary)” Bastien Dubois

 

Short Film (Live Action)

“The Confession” Tanel Toom

“The Crush” Michael Creagh

“God of Love” Luke Matheny

“Na Wewe” Ivan Goldschmidt

“Wish 143” Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

 

Sound Editing

“Inception” Richard King

“Toy Story 3” Tom Myers and Michael Silvers

“Tron: Legacy” Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague

“True Grit” Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey

“Unstoppable” Mark P. Stoeckinger

 

Sound Mixing

“Inception” Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick

“The King's Speech” Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen and John Midgley

“Salt” Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan and William Sarokin

“The Social Network” Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick and Mark Weingarten

“True Grit” Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland

 

Visual Effects

“Alice in Wonderland” Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips

“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1” Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi

“Hereafter” Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojanski and Joe Farrell

“Inception” Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb

“Iron Man 2” Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick

 

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

“127 Hours” Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy

“The Social Network” Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin

“Toy Story 3” Screenplay by Michael Arndt; Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich

“True Grit” Written for the screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen

“Winter's Bone” Adapted for the screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini

 

Writing (Original Screenplay)

“Another Year” Written by Mike Leigh

“The Fighter” Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson;

Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson

“Inception” Written by Christopher Nolan

“The Kids Are All Right” Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg

“The King's Speech” Screenplay by David Seidler

Edited by Aartemys
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Toy Story 3 was the highest grossing film of 2010, both in the USA and worldwide, and the most widely praised films of the year too (99% on RottenTomatoes). Any non-animated film with that would be a shoo-in. But TS3 has no chance with the prejudice against animation. There are 3 Best Picture nominees I haven't seen yet, but of the 7 I have seen, Toy Story 3 was the most poignant.

 

Predictions:

Natalie Portman will win Best Leading Actress.

Toy Story 3 will win best animated film.

The Social Network will win best score.

Colin Firth or James Franco will win Best Actor (Franco will get alot of credit for carrying a whole flick my himself, a feat few can pull off).

This is Bale's first Oscar nomination for either acting category. He's been in so many good films (American Psycho, The Machinist, 3:10 to Yuma, Velvet Goldmine, to name some), and not being nominated til now may work for him or against him.

We are going to hear alot of buzz about Hailee Steinfeld in True Grit. She's a real contender.

Inception will win Art Direction or Cinematography, or both. It will not win Best Picture.

Restrepo, or maybe Inside, Job will win best doc.

 

Why is Toy Story 3 nominated in the Best Adapted Screenplay category? Because it's a sequel? The King's Speech is adapted from real-life events, if anything, it would make more sense of that to be considered "adapted."

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Winter's Bone is to Southern Missouri/The Ozark Mountains what No Country For Old Men was for the Texas/Mexico border. It was grim, it was depressing, it perfectly captured the location and people (for once a movie set in Missouri where nobody sounds like they're from North Carolina), and I daresay it had an even better hero than Llewellyn Moss/Sheriff Bell. The girl who played the lead deserves an Oscar too.

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sales and aggregate score sites have something to do with oscars? that's news to me.

I'm saying that any year, any movie that was both the highest grossing & the most universally acclaimed (not one or the other, but both) would be the front-runner, but since it's animated, no one believes it will win.

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Winter's Bone is one that flew under my radar until the Golden Globes noms came out. I hear good things about it and will give it a watch despite the fact Baytor liked it. :2T:

 

King's Speech is also on my must see list, but w/ all the hype it's been getting I've already got a feeling it'll disappoint somewhat (a la Black Swan).

 

I'll have to think on it some more before I post predictions, but I will say the biggest snub I noticed was Nolan for director. This pretty much guarantees Inception won't get best film. :mad:

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I haven't seen it but I can't help thinking Black Swan will get Best Picture. It's the kind of movie the Academy loves.

 

As for the prejudice against animation, Jax, I read an interesting article about how comedy is actually the most overlooked genre at the Oscars. Not since The Great Dictator has a comedy done so well (didnt even win anything either) so perhaps animation isn't quite at the back of the line.

 

I haven't seen Kings Speech, Black Swan, 127 Hours, True Grit, The Fighter or Winters Bone and maybe a few others so I'm very out of the loop this year.

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I haven't seen it but I can't help thinking Black Swan will get Best Picture. It's the kind of movie the Academy loves.

 

 

nah...all of aronofsky's movies are only watchable once because you either want to kill yourself after plunging into deep depression and/or feel extremely confused, frustrated, and angry after watching them. you don't buy them on dvd unless you're pretentious or masochistic, possibly both. best picture winners usually have mass adult appeal. they are rarely "artsy" films. the king's speech would be more of a "best picture" type of movie and i'm interested in how this will end up with 10 nominated films (splitting the votes up among the more popular movies and such). i still stand by inception as being the best movie of the year but i think it suffers from being so seamless in it's execution that people take the complexity of the movie for granted. the social network was excellent but it didn't really make me think about it after like inception did. it's shameful that nolan wasn't nominated.

 

jax, i know older adults have a lot of bias against animated movies winning best picture but i think that will change in the future. i think people in their 30s and below are more open to animated films being exceptional and deserving acclaim...basically people who grew up watching pixar and miyazaki, which raised the bar for what an animated movie could accomplish. but for now, no, TS3 won't win.

Edited by La Lindsay
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As for the prejudice against animation, Jax, I read an interesting article about how comedy is actually the most overlooked genre at the Oscars. Not since The Great Dictator has a comedy done so well (didnt even win anything either) so perhaps animation isn't quite at the back of the line.

It's close, but in recent years, the academy usually recognizes a token comedy. This year it's The Kid's Are All Right, previous years Juno, Sideways, and Little Miss Sunshine have gotten some love. And I would say Chicago qualifies as a comedy. It's a musical, but it's more comedy than drama. Plus Shakespeare in Love was a romantic comedy, and it won despite the anti-comedy prejudice and despite being undeserving (there were at least three films that were nominated and more deserving, and dozens released that year that were more deserving). Annie Hall won best pic and in 3 other major categories. If you count movies that qualify as drama-comedies, Rain Man, American Beauty and Forrest Gump could all count. It's not really accurate to say The Great Dictator was the last comedy to do well.

 

Also, fantasy is unusually not appreciated, with the exception of LOTR, which was highly recognized because it also fell into a category that the Academy DOES love, an epic, specifically a war epic. Fans of the genre often say that Horror is overlooked quite a bit (The Exorcist got a nom and Silence of the Lambs got a win, and many would say Silence of the Lambs isn't really a horror flick).

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It's close, but in recent years, the academy usually recognizes a token comedy. This year it's The Kid's Are All Right, previous years Juno, Sideways, and Little Miss Sunshine have gotten some love.

 

 

Am I the only person who didn't think The Kids Are All Right was funny?

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nah...all of aronofsky's movies are only watchable once because you either want to kill yourself after plunging into deep depression and/or feel extremely confused, frustrated, and angry after watching them. you don't buy them on dvd unless you're pretentious or masochistic, possibly both.

or you want to watch the token OMFG! sexy scenes :D

 

Connoly's stripper party scenes in Requiem and Portman/Kunis in their lez scene and Portman in her solo adventure in Black Swan

 

 

best picture winners usually have mass adult appeal. they are rarely "artsy" films. the king's speech would be more of a "best picture" type of movie and i'm interested in how this will end up with 10 nominated films (splitting the votes up among the more popular movies and such). i still stand by inception as being the best movie of the year but i think it suffers from being so seamless in it's execution that people take the complexity of the movie for granted. the social network was excellent but it didn't really make me think about it after like inception did. it's shameful that nolan wasn't nominated.

 

jax, i know older adults have a lot of bias against animated movies winning best picture but i think that will change in the future. i think people in their 30s and below are more open to animated films being exceptional and deserving acclaim...basically people who grew up watching pixar and miyazaki, which raised the bar for what an animated movie could accomplish. but for now, no, TS3 won't win.

Agreed. For me, Inception was the best film of 2010. Sadly, I don't think it'll win though. It has a shot since Hollywood awarded indie films last year w/ all the Hurt Locker love. But I'd say the odds ar ein The Social Network's favor to win best picture. It's that right mix of smart, indie drama and mainstream appeal that Oscar seems to dig on.

Oh look, Vegas seems to agree w/ me. ^_^

 

And I can't put out my personal choices for winners yet as I still haven't seen all the nominated films (King's Speech, Kids Are All Right, Winter's Bone, 127 Hours), but Hollywood is politics (the high school kind), so you don't need to have seen the films to make a guess as to which films they will choose. So here's my list of films/people I think Oscar will pick, not one's that actually deserve to win.

 

 

Actor in a Leading Role

Colin Firth in "The King's Speech"

 

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale in "The Fighter"

 

Actress in a Leading Role

Natalie Portman in "Black Swan"

 

Actress in a Supporting Role

Melissa Leo in "The Fighter"

 

Animated Feature Film

"Toy Story 3" Lee Unkrich

 

Art Direction

Production Design: Guy Hendrix Dyas; Set Decoration: Larry Dias and Doug Mowat

"The King's Speech"

 

Cinematography

"Inception" Wally Pfister

 

Costume Design

"The King's Speech" Jenny Beavan

 

Directing

"The Social Network" David Fincher

 

Documentary (Feature)

"Restrepo" Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger

 

Film Editing

"The Social Network" Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

 

Foreign Language Film

"Biutiful" Mexico

 

Makeup

"The Wolfman" Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

 

Music (Original Score)

"The Social Network" Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

 

Music (Original Song)

"If I Rise" from "127 Hours" Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong

 

Sound Editing

"Toy Story 3" Tom Myers and Michael Silvers

 

Sound Mixing

"Inception" Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick

 

Visual Effects

"Inception" Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb

 

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

"The Social Network" Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin

 

Writing (Original Screenplay)

"The King's Speech" Screenplay by David Seidler

 

Best Picture

"The Social Network" Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ceán Chaffin, Producers

 

 

 

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I hadn't thought of this till I read it today, but it makes no sense that Hailee Steinfeld as nominated in the Best Supporting Actress category. She was the lead of that movie. She was in nearly every scene, narrated, and essentially carried it. The studio obviously pushed for her to be nominated in the Supporting category so she'd be competitive to win, but she was as much a supporting actress as James Franco was a supporting actor in 127 Hours.

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