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Bully: A Documentary


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Baytor thought this was a faux documentary in the vein of The Office, but everything I've found on it seems to be legit.

 

In fact, the film is apparently TOO real for the MPAA. They gave it an R rating. Yet another example of how the MPAA is a usless contrivance; they deem a documentary about middle school violence too violent for middle schoolers to watch!

 

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I assume 'baytor is referring to the scene on the school bus. From what I can tell, it looks to me like that's some shaky hand held footage. From behind. Not quite the same as a tripod and a boom mic.

 

Besides, this is the age where kids will actually film themselves doing violent/illegal shit.

Edited by Thelogan
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They will film themselves, but it won't look professionally done minus some shaky-cam. It's not just the bus, it's every scene of kids getting bullied, it's like they handed each kid a sawbuck and said "go push that fat kid." I mean, that's probably exactly what it looks like but don't piss in my pocket and tell me it's raining.

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They will film themselves, but it won't look professionally done minus some shaky-cam. It's not just the bus, it's every scene of kids getting bullied, it's like they handed each kid a sawbuck and said "go push that fat kid." I mean, that's probably exactly what it looks like but don't piss in my pocket and tell me it's raining.

Qouted for posterity. I've a feeling after you see the actual film you'll need to eat a big piece of humble pie. That is if you're capable of humility.

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Even if it is staged, it isn't about believing whether or not someone actually filmed some kids getting picked on. The fact that the director is getting out this message of ignorance when it comes to bullying is the important thing. This shit happens unnoticed often enough that some cameras on these kids isn't gonna stop them from being a dick.

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Qouted for posterity. I've a feeling after you see the actual film you'll need to eat a big piece of humble pie. That is if you're capable of humility.

 

Oh no, I support the movie and its message. Bullying is bad, you've seen pictures of me: do I strike you as someone who was Johnny Popularity in school? Junior High was a fucking nightmare and I often wonder how the fuck I even got through it. My beef is with staged "real footage", just put a "dramatization" sticker on it.

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Even if it is staged, it isn't about believing whether or not someone actually filmed some kids getting picked on. The fact that the director is getting out this message of ignorance when it comes to bullying is the important thing. This shit happens unnoticed often enough that some cameras on these kids isn't gonna stop them from being a dick.

 

duh.gif

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Oh no, I support the movie and its message. Bullying is bad, you've seen pictures of me: do I strike you as someone who was Johnny Popularity in school? Junior High was a fucking nightmare and I often wonder how the fuck I even got through it. My beef is with staged "real footage", just put a "dramatization" sticker on it.

Oh, I believe it. I don't think most people get through middle school unscathed. We're all overly emotional, hyper sensitive, and impressionable at that stage. And it's anywhere from 10x-100x worse for anyone that deviates from whatever the perceived norm (be it physically or otherwise) may be at that time.

 

I didn't mean to imply you were against the message of the film; I think you're wrong on the whole "staged footage" thing. I teach middle school, and you'd be surprised at what the kids do and say in the hallways where video camera's are, in class rooms, and right in front of teachers. Tact and rational thought (especially when consequences are involved) are in short supply for many middle schoolers. And the understanding and/or possesion of the concept of respect (be it for authority, peers, or themselves) is altogether absent for some kids. And those kids are usually bullies. So, as Axel put it, I don't think the bullies would be able to suppress their true nature for very long, even with cameras and adults wirlding them nearby. I am highly prone to believe that footage in the trailer it totally legit.

 

Again, hopefully after we see the actual film this will be clearer to you and to parents of kids that are bullies and/or have been bullied.

Edited by Mr. Hakujin
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We should talk about personal experiences.

 

Myself, middle school was the only time I can remember where someone actually put their hands on me. I got some social and verbal shit before that, naturally, but I'd never I'd never been in a fight. Maybe a shove or something, but I don't recall a specific situation.

 

And it wasn't even a fight. Dude just knocked me in the jaw during P.E. for no apparent reason, then he picked up a board and half heartedly hit me in the leg. Some big mexican kid that had been held back a few years, who I'd never even spoken to.

I just started walking across the football field. I was shaking and tearing up. I don't remember it hurting, I was just really frustrated. He hit me! Who does that?

 

High school, I didn't have these problems. If people talked shit (and I have no doubt that they did), they had the decency to do it behind my back. I was a big fella with a proclivity towards chains and spikes.

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Yeah high school didn't give me nearly as many problems as junior high. I know that grade systems tend to differ depending on where you went. My junior high was 7th, 8th, and 9th grade. So there was this awkward ass gap with these little kids to what is technically a high school freshmen. P.E. was indeed shit. I had these people I hung around that I now realize were a bunch of assholes. They were those 'friends' that are some of the coolest people when it is just the two of you talking, but when other people show up they turn into the meanest bunch of dicks around. But being in junior high when you get separated from all of your elementary friends, I took what I could get. I still had a couple of those in high school, but I was smart enough to ditch those fuckers when I had had enough. I can't remember any specific event, but their meanness basically came in the form of name calling and acting like I was all cool with it. It only got worse when they realized I wasn't though.

 

One thing that really pissed me off about junior high (this is totally off topic of bullying btw, this just comes to mind) was when I was in 8th grade I was in my science class. I had a coach/teacher for that one and he really was terrible as most coach/teachers are. Anyway I remember a day when me and like 2 or 3 other kids brought our gameboys and were playing pokemon. For some reason I was the only one that got "caught" (I was under the impression it was a free day, but what the fuck ever) and got my gameboy taken up. That's not the shitty part. I came back at the end of the day to get it back, cause that is what we were sposda do. Some motherfucker stole that shit right out of the teacher's desk! That was my 2nd gameboy stolen in 2 years. It didn't even bother me it was taken, it bothered me it was taken from an authority figure I was supposed to trust. He shrugged that shit off like it was nothing.

 

 

Man fuck that time period.

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I hated high school. I was teased ruthlessly, and coupled with a really crummy family life, it all felt like too much most of the time.

 

SO! I ran away. A lot. I think in the end things kinda worked out. But those things, those mean, terrible things people say about you, they stick with you. I don't care how tough you think you are, I have yet to meet a person whose life wasn't impacted in a pretty dramatic way if they were bullied in school. To this day Im still really awkward, and way, way more self conscious of things then I probably should be. I mean, of course not all of that is thanks to bullying, but I would say it was by and large the catalyst.

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I agree that bullying is wrong and can be devastating for some people. I say people because bullying happens in the adult world too. However, I do think there is a line that is crossed when teasing in good fun becomes malicious. Working in an elementary school, there are some cases I see where a parent has turned their child into a whiney bitch and they need a serious does of reality, that no, not everyone will like you and think you are special like your parents (hopefully) do. However, that does not mean that you have to be someone's doormat or give a fuck what that person thinks.

 

Every year I tell my third graders, "We are a team. We will be spending a lot of time together. There will be good days and fun days and hard days and awful days. However, no matter how rough today is, tomorrow is another chance to start new and make it a great day. We are here to work together as a team toward success. Now, I am not saying you have to be friends with and like everyone or anyone (however, when you have friends at school it does kind of make things more fun) in this classroom, but you WILL RESPECT each person, their property, and their feelings. Likewise, you will be given the same respect. This is not an option."

 

That's not verbatim, but you get the idea. To a third grader I am usually intimidating enough for them to realize that I am quite serious. For those who are not sold right away, we then break into a discussion on consequences and how they can be both positive and negative based on the decisions we make. I also add that they need to remember that when they are enduring a negative consequence, it does no good to view the situation as simply being punished, but dealing with the fallout of their own poor decision making.

 

I then tell them, if they want things to be different and want to start enjoying positive consequences, then next time, make a better choice.

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  • 1 month later...

The Weinsteins say "Fuck the MPAA"and release Bully unrated.

 

Following ComingSoon.net's interview earlier today with Bully director Lee Hirsch, The Weinstein company has announced that, due to their ongoing conflict with the MPAA over the film's rating, Bully will be released in theaters on March 30th as an unrated film. Details about the announcement are included in the official press release:

 

After a recent plea to the MPAA by BULLY teen Alex Libby and The Weinstein Company (TWC) Co-Chairman Harvey Weinstein failed – by one vote – to get the film its deserved PG-13 rating, TWC is choosing to move forward with releasing the film unrated by the MPAA on March 30.

 

Furthering proof that the R rating for some language is inappropriate for a film that's meant to educate and help parents, teachers, school officials and children with what's become an epidemic in schools around the country, the fight against the rating continues on. The outpour of support by politicians, schools, parents, celebrities and activists for the film's mission to be seen by those it was made for – children – has been overwhelming. Nearly half a million people have signed Michigan high school student and former bullying victim Katy Butler's petition on Change.org to urge the MPAA to lower the rating.

 

Said BULLY Director Lee Hirsch, "The small amount of language in the film that's responsible for the R rating is there because it's real. It's what the children who are victims of bullying face on most days. All of our supporters see that, and we're grateful for the support we've received across the board. I know the kids will come, so it's up to the theaters to let them in."

 

"The kids and families in this film are true heroes, and we believe theater owners everywhere will step up and do what's right for the benefit of all of the children out there who have been bullied or may have otherwise become bullies themselves. We're working to do everything we can to make this film available to as many parents, teachers and students across the country," said TWC President of Marketing Stephen Bruno.

 

For parents or teachers who are looking for more information or who may have concerns about showing children a movie unrated by the MPAA, please read Common Sense Media's rating details of the film here: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/bully.

 

"While it's often heartbreaking and deals with tough issues like suicide, the movie addresses bullying in a frank and relatable way that is age appropriate for teens and relevant for middle schoolers if an adult is present to guide the discussion," said James P. Steyer, Founder and CEO, Common Sense Media. "The MPAA's ratings system is inadequate when it comes looking at a movie's content through the lens of its larger thematic issues. Common Sense Media provides alternative ratings for parents who are looking for more guidance and context than the MPAA provides."

BULLY will be released in theaters on Friday, March 30th in New York at the Angelika Film Center and AMC Lincoln Square and in Los Angeles at The Landmark, ArcLight Hollywood and AMC Century City.

 

BULLY is a beautifully cinematic, character-driven documentary. At its heart are those with huge stakes in this issue whose stories each represent a different facet of America's bullying crisis. Filmed over the course of the 2009/2010 school year, BULLY opens a window onto the pained and often endangered lives of bullied kids, revealing a problem that transcends geographic, racial, ethnic and economic borders. It documents the responses of teachers and administrators to aggressive behaviors that defy "kids will be kids" cliches, and it captures a growing movement among parents and youths to change how bullying is handled in schools, in communities and in society as a whole.

 

uQPQ6.gif

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^ that's awesome.

 

As a parent I fear that my kid will be bullied, not becuase he's a wuss but becuase he has a very sweet temperment, he cried during Mars Needs Moms, he loves his dog and sister, and his family is everything to him. The idea that someone could take that security away from him with harsh words and actions angers me to no end. Not only that, but i've actually seen my kid fight back in person, another kid was in his face, my kid told him to get out of his face several times before punching him in the face, needless to say the other kid was crying, but so was Logan. It surprised me as much as it did him, he just...reacted. Of course my kid is a brute, so despite the fact that the other kid was obviously antagonzing him, it was still all Logan's fault. Becuase he's bigger. (insert my eye roll here).

 

As far as my exerience in middle and high school went, i stuck to my friends and we stuck together, so we all got teased together lol. having a close knit small group of friends helped me get through school, and we hardly popular. there were outcasts that were misunderstood, and we had one suicide in my class. His name was Matt but i didn't even know his name until he had died. I think what bothered me the most was that no one gave a rats ass about the kid until he died and it was too late. I mean, the cheerleading squad suddendly decided that this kid was some sort of hero and sold cookies to build a bench in his honor. Whopp-dee-fucking doo. I still that shit with adults today, on my facebook feed alone there's all kinds of people caring after the fact, like, "oh this kid died of cancer! i only care becuase he DIED of cancer and i want everyone else to know that i took the time to tell you all how bad i feel a bout it". It's such crap.

 

 

Sorry, I went WAY off topic there.

 

Anyways, i'm very interested to see this film,

also this, I'm sure most of you have seen it before, but here it is if you haven't. i could seriously see my kid reacting this way, and as soon as i saw the video I felt like I was watching my own kid.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYzkgFdR2zI&feature=fvst

Edited by HypnotizinChikns
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Weinsteins have a mixed rep in Hollywood, but they're known for throwing all their power behind creators they believe in. Ballsy move to release it unrated rather than make the director do the usual studio thing of editing it down then releasing the "real" version on video.

 

And Dr. Chikins, that video is epic win. I've seen it before, but I never get tired of watching a kid react to a bully in a peaceful manner then only resorting to violence as a last resort. Watching that shitstained bully limp off camera gives me a measure of hope for the future in some small way--not to mention A LOT of guilty satisfaction. :D

Edited by Mr. Hakujin
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